Microsoft buys carbon removal credits to offset emissions

carbon capture

CarbonCapture, a U.S. climate tech company that develops direct air capture (DAC) systems based on a groundbreaking modular open systems architecture, has announced an agreement with Microsoft to provide engineered carbon removal credits.

According to the World Resources Institute, direct air capture is a technology that uses chemical reactions to pull carbon dioxide out of air. When air moves over these chemicals, they selectively react with and trap CO2, allowing the other components of air to pass through. Once carbon dioxide is captured from the atmosphere, heat is typically applied to release it from the solvent or sorbent. The captured CO2 can then be injected deep underground for sequestration in certain geologic formations or used in various products and applications. 

“We are thrilled to help Microsoft move toward its commitment to be carbon negative by 2030 and to remove all of its historic CO2 emissions by 2050,” said Adrian Corless, CEO and CTO, CarbonCapture. “Validation of CarbonCapture’s scalable approach to DAC from a forward-thinking company like Microsoft is an important signal to the entire market, demonstrating the value of high-quality carbon removal credits.”

CarbonCapture designs and manufactures modular DAC systems that can be deployed in large arrays. Currently, the company is developing Project Bison, a large DAC facility in Wyoming, that will follow a phased rollout plan to capture and store five million tonnes of atmospheric CO2 per year by 2030. This project is expected to be the first commercial-scale project to utilise Class VI injection wells to permanently store CO2 captured from ambient air using DAC technology and the first massively scalable DAC project in the United States.

“Purchasing DAC carbon removal credits is an important part of Microsoft’s pursuit of permanent, durable carbon removal,” said Phillip Goodman, director, carbon removal portfolio, Microsoft. “This agreement with CarbonCapture helps us move toward our carbon negative goal, while also helping to catalyse the growth of the direct air capture industry as a whole.”

In addition to dramatically reducing current emissions, the global community needs to collectively remove six to ten billion tons of carbon dioxide per year by 2050 in order to remain on a path to limiting global warming to 1.5°C. As DAC facilities begin to come online over the next several years, corporations like Microsoft are playing a critical role in helping to scale capacity by committing to advanced purchase agreements.

Partner Resources

Popular Right Now

Edgecore Insight Podcast

Ep-1: Navigating the Waters of Sustainability

Others have also read ...